knavery


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

knav·er·y

?(nā′və-rē)
n. pl. knav·er·ies
1. Dishonest or crafty dealing.
2. An instance of trickery or mischief.
American Heritage? Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright ? 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

knavery

(?ne?v?r?)
n, pl -eries
1. a deceitful or dishonest act
2. dishonest conduct; trickery
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 ? HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

knav•er•y

(ˈneɪ və ri)

n., pl. -er•ies.
1. unprincipled or dishonest dealing; trickery.
2. a knavish act or practice.
[1520–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, ? 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

knavery

petty dishonesty or fraud. — knave, n. — knavish, adj.
See also: Crime
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knavery - lack of honesty; acts of lying or cheating or stealing
actus reus, wrongful conduct, misconduct, wrongdoing - activity that transgresses moral or civil law; "he denied any wrongdoing"
betrayal, perfidy, treachery, treason - an act of deliberate betrayal
charlatanism, quackery - the dishonesty of a charlatan
trick - an attempt to get you to do something foolish or imprudent; "that offer was a dirty trick"
falsehood, falsification - the act of rendering something false as by fraudulent changes (of documents or measures etc.) or counterfeiting
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. ? 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

knavery

noun (Old-fashioned) dishonesty, fraud, corruption, deception, deceit, trickery, duplicity, double-dealing, chicanery, villainy, imposture, roguery, rascality a hotbed of intrigue and malicious knavery
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 ? HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

knavery

[ˈneɪvərɪ] Nbellaquería f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 ? William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 ? HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

knavery

n (old)Bubenstück nt (old), → Büberei f (old)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. ? William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 ? HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Mercury, displeased at his knavery, not only took away the golden axe, but refused to recover for him the axe he had thrown into the pool.
The adventures of his rogue of a hero, who began life as the servant and accomplice of a blind beggar, and then adventured on through a most diverting career of knavery, brought back the atmosphere of Don Quixote, and all the landscape of that dear wonder- world of Spain, where I had lived so much, and I followed him with all the old delight.
Monks, still bearing that assumed name, retired with his portion to a distant part of the New World; where, having quickly squandered it, he once more fell into his old courses, and, after undergoing a long confinement for some fresh act of fraud and knavery, at length sunk under an attack of his old disorder, and died in prison.
I have gotten one of Doctor Faustus' conjuring-books; and now we'll have such knavery as't passes.
I thought 'twas your knavery to take it away: come, give it me again.
Even if his father could not be persuaded, they could fly to Ptarth, laying all the blame of the knavery and intrigue that had thrown four great nations into war, upon the shoulders of Nutus.
From whence is it that the knave is generally so quick-sighted to those symptoms and operations of knavery, which often dupe an honest man of a much better understanding?
'knavery', 'dirt,' 'filth,' 'slime,' 'ditch-water,' and other critical remarks of the like nature.
Visions of gallantry, knavery, robbery; and of the nightly absences from home for which he had accounted so strangely, having been occasioned by some unlawful pursuit; flocked into her brain and rendered her afraid to question him.
"'Tis a safe thing to calculate on the knavery of an Iroquois," said the scout, throwing his rifle forward, by a sort of instinctive movement.
``Old thou mayst be,'' replied the knight; ``more shame to their folly who have suffered thee to grow grey in usury and knavery Feeble thou mayst be, for when had a Jew either heart or hand But rich it is well known thou art.''
9mobile further slammed Wood even as it wished him good luck in future endeavours by, saying, 'It is regrettable that Mr Wood has allowed the same avarice, rascality, impatience and knavery that characterized his turbulent association with, and inglorious exits from several other companies to manifest again so early in 9mobile.